Help my Uncle Jack off a horse?


Something that greatly worries me about the present and future is the complete disregard for grammatical correctness. These spelling and grammar mistakes started out with the replacing “your” with “you’re” and vice versa but they have gotten completely out of hand. What is even worse is that they have become accepted.

I recently found someone who spelled “grasshopper” as “grass hoper” (someone who yearns for spring during a Canadian winter?). There was also a girl who asked Facebook what her “new year revolution” should be.

However, my previous entry tackles spelling and grammar. This time I’m focussing more on our application of the language.

Another thing that seems to be happening, on top of the misspelling of over-used sayings, is the misuse of over-used sayings. We’ve become so accustomed to hearing and using the same phrases that we just throw them around without even thinking.

How many times have you been asked a question and instantly replied “I don’t know” and then proceeded to answer the question (or you know, remembered the answer and just walked away. I’ll bet you have, don’t lie now. Jerk.)

How many times have you perfectly heard what someone said, yet still asked “what?” for clarification? How many times have you then proceeded to be mildly frustrated while the other person is repeating what you have already heard and you don’t yet have the option to reply?

These are two of the many habits that I catch myself constantly doing and seeing others do as well. While they may be mild annoyances, I find them to be part of a larger problem.

An argument I have heard for this point is that saying “I don’t know” and “what?” as an immediate answer gives you time to think properly about the question. Much like when you’re asked a math problem. You repeat it and come up with the answer without looking like you paused.

Perhaps this has something to do with how we expect everything instantly and are in such a hurry to get answers so we feel that it is necessary to give an answer the millisecond someone asks us a question. I say slow down! Think about your answers before you spit something out. Don’t just regurgitate useless phrases that do not aid the listener.

I have heard so many misused words this week. I heard someone, while discussing a band they dislike (Nickelback), say that the singer’s voice was redundant (Yes, I agree you can spin it to mildly make sense, but come on). I also heard someone say, as they were describing the fact that the contents of their salad bowl were decreasing as they ate, that their bowl was “demeanouring” (perhaps they meant depleting because I can’t find a meaning for that word).

It seems to have become that our conversations are experiencing a slow decline of creativity (well actually, perhaps a bit too much inventiveness) and sophistication. Not only is there little thought going into Facebook posts and texts, but also in conversation. I don’t want to watch you slowly sink into a state of inarticulateness.

Pay attention to what you say.  Pay attention to what others say. Learn from the mistakes you see (and laugh at them).

I find an eternal source of amusement from people who can’t even master the simplest concepts. This example I found is an extremely unfortunate inability to differentiate between “then” and “than”. This was someone’s Facebook status: “I’d rather be pissed off, then pissed on” (rather than the other way around?).

See how important one letter can be? Could be the difference of “putting a batch in the oven” and well… an attempted murder (also known as two crows standing in a field… tehehe).

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About lonelemming

18-year-old student at the University of Waterloo studying in a Legal Studies and Business Co-op program.
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